Monthly Archives: August 2012

Quick and Easy Ways to Feel and Move Better: Installment 16 | Eric Cressey | High Performance Training, Personal Training

Jacking up my sleep is my primary complaint….

 

3. Remember that booze continues to be a poor post-training nutrition strategy.

Many people sabotage their gym efforts by consuming far too much alcohol. In fact, it’s probably more prevalent than we think even in the most dedicated gym-goers. After all, many people who consider themselves avid exercise enthusiasts are also those who frequent bars and clubs to show off their hard work in the gym. Consider this study, published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, that found alcohol ingested post-training by rugby players had a detrimental effect on both peak power outputs and recovery. It’s not something you didn’t already assume, but nonetheless, it’s a reminder that alcohol and peak performance don’t mix. If you are an athlete over the age of 21, reflect on what is important to you. Be a professional, and do the things that separate the average from the elite. This includes taking into account your recovery, something alcohol certainly will not expedite. For the rest of us, if you are going to embody a healthy lifestyle, do it to the fullest and be aware of your alcohol consumption. For further reasoning, consider these additional ways alcohol negatively impacts your training and health: it contains empty calories, raises estrogen (beer, mostly), dehydrates you, taxes your liver, ruins your sleep, diminishes muscle recovery functions, I could go on. Bottom line, if your training is important to you, you will limit alcohol consumption.

via Quick and Easy Ways to Feel and Move Better: Installment 16 | Eric Cressey | High Performance Training, Personal Training.

Seth’s Blog: Most people

Most people don’t care enough to make a difference.

Most people aren’t going to buy that new thing you’re selling.

Most people are afraid to take action.

Most people are too self-involved to do the generous work you’re hoping for.

Most people think they can’t afford it.

Most people won’t talk about it.

Most people aren’t going to read what you wrote.

Fortunately, you’re not most people. Neither are your best customers.

via Seth’s Blog: Most people.

Seth’s Blog: #1 in a small market…

is way more interesting, more fruitful and more fun than being number three in a larger market.

When you’re the market leader, you set the agenda, you attract the leading customers and you are the one who gets targeted, picked on and singled out. The stakes are higher and so is your impact.

The easiest way to become #1 is to redefine your focus and the way you serve your customers sufficiently that you redefine the market. Harley Davidson isn’t #1 in the market for motorcycles, but they are certainly #1 in the market for the kind of motorcycle that they sell. The other bikes may have two wheels, but they’re for different customers with different needs.

Mass ennui is defeated by focused passion every time.

via Seth’s Blog: #1 in a small market….

» An Intentional Life :zenhabits

An Intentional Life

Post written by Leo Babauta.

Many of us go through our days awake, but following patterns we’ve developed over the years. We are going through the motions, doing things at home, online, at work without much forethought.

Contrast this with the idea of an Intentional Life: everything you do is done with consciousness, fulfilling one of your core values (compassion, for example). Everything is done with a conscious intent.

It’s true that many things we do have some kind of intent — I’m washing the dishes because I don’t want a messy house or bugs in my kitchen; I’m driving to work because I need to make a living; I’m driving my kids to school because they need to learn. But after repeating these actions every day, the intent kind of fades into the background so that we are barely aware of them. We’ve figured out the intent long ago, and don’t need to think about them anymore.

What if that changed?

What if you were very aware of your intention for your actions? How would that transform the action, and your life?

What if you washed the dishes, but first said you are doing this as a service to your family, to make them happy, and as a form of meditation for yourself, to practice mindfulness? Doing the dishes would suddenly take on much more importance, and would cease to be boring.

The only difference is intention.

What if driving to work was done after mentally declaring an intention to help others at work, to make people happy, to find satisfaction through work? The drive might be much happier, and you might be less likely to get irate when someone inevitably cuts you off in traffic.

This is the Intentional Life.

I practice it in bits and pieces — not all the time, but increasingly. When I do it, my life is different. More purposeful, more consciously lived, more content with any action.

A simple practice of intentionality: before you do the next action online or at work, pause a moment, close your eyes, and mentally say your intention. Why are you doing this? Is it out of compassion for others, or yourself? Is it to make someone happier? To improve the world? Out of gratitude for the work and kindness of others?

And then, as you do the action, be mindful of your intention.

This is a small step, but in those few moments, you will be living an Intentional Life.

via » An Intentional Life :zenhabits.

The Disciplined Pursuit of Less – Greg McKeown – Harvard Business Review

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials. Not just once a year as part of a planning meeting, but constantly reducing, focusing and simplifying. Not just getting rid of the obvious time wasters, but being willing to cut out really terrific opportunities as well. Few appear to have the courage to live this principle, which may be why it differentiates successful people and organizations from the very successful ones.

via The Disciplined Pursuit of Less – Greg McKeown – Harvard Business Review.

Seth’s Blog: Stuck?

It might not be because you can’t find the right answer.

It’s almost certainly because you’re asking the wrong question.

The more aggressively you redefine the problem, the more likely it is you’re going to solve it.

The most successful people I know got that way by ignoring the race to find the elusive, there’s-only-one-and-no-one-has-found-it right answer and instead had the guts to look at the infinite landscape of choices and pick a better problem instead.

via Seth’s Blog: Stuck?.